Archive for December, 2012

Scoopit Cool Content Curation Report

Scoop.it Content Curation Report Scoop.it’s analytics are excellent if manual (unless I missed the export to Excel option which is very possible). After a little over a year of Scooping content I wanted to answer three questions: What type of content generated the most views? What keyword triggers formed the most successful headlines? What is the value of cherished Internet marketing notions? * The move to a more visual web as expressed in a sea of infographics. * Have we reached a point of diminishing returns on infographics? *  Is storytelling as hot as it seems? * What about Social, Local and Mobile are they as hot as they seem? How I Created The Report I only worked with data from Curation Revolution .  I moved views by Scoop information from Scoop.it’s analytics into a spreadsheet for the top 50 Scoops. What is a Scoop? A Scoop is curating content from any source into one of the 12 digital revolutions  I’ve created. Scoop.it provides a good spider tool. You list keywords and Scoop.it’s spider tool searches the social web bringing back thousands of pieces of related content. When I started I used Scoop.it’s spider to find content that felt special enough to warrant a “Scoop”. Now I use the spider about 10% of the time preferring to tap trusted sources for my Internet marketing scoops. The ultimate top of the funnel test for the Scoop.it Cool Content Curation Report is views. What content generates the most return for the time it took to curate? The Scoop.it Cool Content Curation Report is a step closer to the heaven of having top of funnel traffic generation tied to bottom of funnel conversion data. Topline Results Total Scoops: 1,351 generating Total Views: 15,785 with an average of 43 views per scoop. Top 50 Scoops Total Views: 5,002 with an average of 100 views per scoop or 132% above overall average. Top 50 Scoops accounted for 32% of total views. Top 10 Scoops accounted for 12% of total views. Questions In order to answer my content curation questions I tagged each of the top 50 posts with Content Type and 3 Keywords extracted from the headline: Question #1: What Type Of Content Generated The Most Views? Inevitably no matter how you tag there are stragglers, so I smoothed the data a tad moving stranglers into one of ten categories: Social Media Marketing (SMM), Tools […]

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My name is Ally Greer. I’m a marketer with expertise in content marketing and curation. You’ve probably never heard of me. With over 500 million users on Twitter, 175 million on LinkedIn, and over a billion on Facebook, you probably haven’t heard of most people on the Internet. The bad news is that this also means most of those people probably haven’t heard of you either. That said, I’m certainly not here to tell you how flooded the Internet is and discourage you from jumping into the information pool. In fact, I’m telling you to do the exact opposite. Although it isn’t likely that all 500 million people on Twitter will be following you by the time you’re finished reading this (or ever), there are a few ways to look what we call “information overload” right in the face and use it to your advantage. In a digital world characterized by an overwhelming amount of noise, everyone is struggling to find relevant content from people and brands with an expertise on a specific subject. Content curators are the ones who step up to the plate. According to Michael Brenner, cofounder of Business 2 Community,  content curation  is the process of identifying relevant content for your audience from multiple sources, modifying or editing that content to reflect the needs of your audience and delivering the content to the appropriate channels of distribution. The truth is, you’re probably already curating content. Do you share links on Twitter? Do you Retweet content that you find interesting? Do you write blogposts referencing content that’s been created by others? If so, you’re a curator. You know what you’re talking about, you know where the best content on your topic of expertise is, and you put it together for the world to see. But, the question still looms: if no one knows who you are, how will they find it? Enter a platform like  Scoop.it . Scoop.it is a topic-centric curation publishing platform that allows you to create a digital magazine of the content that you’re sharing. This type of platform feeds you with content that’s relevant to your brand and your area of expertise, lets you hand select which content you’d like to share, provides you with the opportunity to add insight and context, and shares the content to all of your social networks. The cherry on the cake, though, is that all of your […]

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Here are the key best practices I’ve observed based on real successful case studies that we regularly report about on the Scoop.it blog (such as http://blog.scoop.it/en/2 012/02/… about IS Decisions, an IT Software Publisher or http://blog.scoop.it/en/2 012/05/… on EcoVadis, a Start-Up doing a Supply Chain Audit platform). Note: it might look like a long list but this is precisely why there are dedicated curation platforms to make all of that easy and integrated. At the end of the day, chances are you’re already doing the time consuming part (reading content) and by using bespoke content curation services, you’ll be getting results with minimum time to invest. 1. Define your topic and your audience Who are you going to be curating for? What are they interesting about? How does it connect with your brand or your products? It’s useless to be curating news about Apple’s latest products just because this can get your traffic if that traffic is meaningless to you, ie doesn’t memorize your brand or convert into leads. 2. Start from what you already do to and define your format Nobody has lots of time on their hands to engage in new activities. The secret is making it a marginal cost. I’ve found most professionals do at least one of these 4 things: – Chances are you already read content related to your business, your market and your topic: develop a habit of curating the good stuff you’re already reading. – If you’re already tweeting links, you’re already doing a part of the work so that’s a good start too. – If you’re emailing links to interesting articles to your colleagues or business partners, you can start there and make them public by curating them. – Attend professional events where you’ll hear talks or panels that people will tweet about: this is great content to curate too. Any of the above is a good starting point and will also help you define the format: what will be your curation format? A media curated from existing stories ( Scoop.it , Paper.li )? Stories curated from tweets, videos or other social objects (Storify)? Or will it be pictures-only (Pinterest)? Videos (Chill)? 3. Organize your sources As per 2, you probably already have content sources (if only Quora since you’re reading this here). Use tools to organize them (plug: Scoop.it helps on that and will also help you identify new ones, […]

View Full Article… www.quora.com

Leveraging Learnist to Enhance Your Teaching

What a great example of leveraging technology to enhance the educational process by educators that will go the extra mile to truly provide a quality educational experience for their students. Leveraging Learnist, we see a teacher that earns the title Educator!

Photo Credit: http://edudemic.com

21st Century School | Feature Teaching With Content Curation With two mobile laptop carts that are used primarily for technology classes and a student body that has limited access to computers outside of school, Stockton Collegiate International School isn’t exactly a hotbed of ed tech. That stumbling block doesn’t stop the K-12 charter school in Stockton, CA, from doing what it can to cultivate its 21st Century learners and prepare them for college and the workforce. In Hauna Zaich’s 8th- and 10th-grade English classes, for example, students—a good portion of whom are English learners—are using a process known as “content curation” to cull through the many resources on the web, select the most relevant ones, and then organize those resources in a logical format for sharing and later use. Defined as the act of discovering, gathering, and presenting digital content that relates a specific subject, content curation is less about creating new resources and more about amassing information and then maintaining it in a logical fashion. In K-12 education, content curation tools can be used to collect and share reading materials with students, stoke conversation about current events, develop group activities, and critique web-based material. Using the curation platform Learnist , Zaich pulls informative resources from the web (including videos, images, articles, and quizzes), curates them, and then makes the information available to her students both in and out of school. When teaching 10th-grade grammar lessons, for example, Zaich replaces a textbook with the many different SAT, GMAT, and GRE test prep materials that are available for free online. She collects video tutorials, handouts, lessons, and other materials on a “board” that students access using their own computers or mobile devices. One of Zaich’s curated boards introduces 10th graders to verb tenses, subject/verb agreement , and active versus passive voice to prep them for a writer’s workshop. Positioned prominently at the top of the board is an infographic that shows students how to take notes using the Cornell note-taking system. The board also includes a summary of active and passive voices added from GMAT and a lesson on the topic from Purdue Online Writing Lab. Another board is populated with resources like a YouTube video lesson on verbs and verb tenses from School House Rock and a lesson on verb problem-solving from SAT/ACT. Flipping the Classroom When selecting content to curate, Zaich said she looks for “areas where my  View Full Article… thejournal.com

 

Introducing Learnist

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The Five Rs of 21st Century Content Curation

Why do I constantly update my Google Reader RSS feeds? Adding categories, fine tuning reading lists, then upsetting them all over again when I stumble upon several great sites. That’s because I rely on information discovery to push my own thinking . The more I broaden and diversify my reading, chasing tangents, listening to, and verifying opposing views, the sharper my ability to see and make sense of trends. Saying we have filter failure is not capturing the depth of the challenges we face. Defining the problem Real time streams and social graphs are training people to react . I see the transformation also in blog comments. It is tempting to use the seagull move — who has the time, right? Reacting to information is the exact opposite of critical thinking .  It will not help you or your business understand why a trend may be emerging, what it means to you, and how to reorganize your thinking about it. As more people and organizations become publishers, the merits of curating information as content strategy go up. Curation, as in making sense, also has a prominent role in how organizations develop and transmit news . However, not all curation activities are created equal. Five activities that pay dividends on content curation Research There’s no point producing content before you have a firm handle on what the target audience wants. Steve Jobs is a great example of the kind of preparation that goes into understanding your audience needs and building community . For all the talk of listening and responding in social media and networks, few do integrate social listening into actual, traditional reseach. Focus groups, call out — even informal user surveys. There’s no substitute for actual data. Rotation People often say they want “variety” online. It turns out what they really want is to read their favorites more than stuff they like less. It’s a balancing act introducing fresh ideas and replaying the ones that are still popular in social media. Content should be rotated in the same way. Based on the research, divide content into ranked topics: Primary, Secondary, Tertiary. Primary content should never be more than a click deep, and always in the view of someone visiting any site page. It should comprise about half what you publish, both in terms of volume and sequence. Secondary content comprises the next 30% or so of your research […]

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Content curation makes it sound like I’m the grammar doctor here to fix your ailing content. And while I’d love to offer you my content writing services to do just that, I’m really referring to two concepts: 1) Curating your existing content 2) Curating other people’s content What does it mean to curate? The curator of a museum is the one in charge of the collection. He or she catalogs the works, authenticates them, validates them, and assembles the best darn collection that the museum’s patrons will love.  The official definition of curator is “one who manages or oversees.”  Curation means the act of the curator; it is managing one’s content. So what does content curation do for your business? More importantly – ah, you knew what I was going to say, didn’t you? – what does it do for your customers, clients or readers? One of the first steps I take when embarking on large content marketing projects for client websites is content curation. I take a content inventory. When I worked for Macy’s, we conducted a physical inventory twice a year.  It was quite the chore, but a necessary chore.  Physically counting every blouse, skirt and t-shirt in the place ensured that any losses were accounted for and the book could be reconciled. More importantly – and this happened nearly every single time – we’d end up taking inventory say, in the stock room, and uncover a missing box of t-shirts or a rack of dresses we didn’t know we had.  And that meant we could then offer them for sale.  Once we took inventory, we knew what we had and could offer it to our customers. A content inventory is similar in nature to a store’s inventory.  You look across all your content channels and log the content into a spreadsheet so you know what you have.  Your content channels may include: Your website Other websites Blog Slideshare or another PowerPoint sharing site eBooks and other PDF-style content Podcasts Videos Images Infographics Other I usually record my content on an Excel spreadsheet and include: Title of the content Date first published Location with URL of where it appears Topic Summary Last time shared The content inventory provides me with a good overview of what I have to share, and where there are gaps. For instance, taking a content inventory of my Blog Talk Radio Show, Gentle […]

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B2B Integrated Marcom: The Role of Content Curation

You are here: Home / B2B copywriting / B2B Integrated Marcom: The Role of Content Curation B2B content curation involves placing context around content. In my opinion, curating content should be applied to a content marketing strategy with the goal of placing context around a piece of content created by a source other than yourself.  So for example, let’s say you’re a B2B tech firm who develops service desk automation software and you’re curating content about IT service management.  The goal is not simply to retweet or reference the content, but to place it within the context of your company’s product or service. Here’s how content curation works in a B2B application ( all company and product names are fictitious, of course! )… Awesome Engineering publishes a post on how their service desk improved service levels and decreased operating costs by automating their service desk. Your company, Super Duper Service Desk Software, is looking for source material to write post about ITIL certification (Information Technology Infrastructure Library), a related topic to the service desk. Awesome Engineering’s post provides a firsthand look at ITIL principles at work. Curating Awesome Engineering’s content not only gives you an opportunity to frame their article within the context of Super Duper Service Desk Software’s product, but also provides several content opportunities to insert the Super Duper name and product into the socialsphere.   For example, you could write a blog post about how the Super Duper software automates workflows to follow ITIL best practices.  Then write a tweet or two, covering an ITIL best practice, each of which links back to your blog post along with another tweet that puts your spin on Awesome Engineering’s post and links back to their post. Perhaps there’s also a SlideShare presentation or  YouTube video that’s also relevant.  They, too, are sources of curated content and represent additional opportunities to provide context around your products or services. I like +Jay Acunzo’s analogy that creation represents the bricks and curation, the mortar . He also explains, through an example, that when a curator maintains a “continual, genuine presence via curation, the original content registers more profoundly with followers.” If you plan to integrate curated content into your B2B marcom plan, it helps to have a content calendar .   The content calendar (a.k.a. conversation calendar) locating content easier because you can base you search for content on a specific theme or […]

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Using content curation techniques to deliver a valuable experience to readers and accrue long-term SEO karma is the latest trend sweeping the content marketing sphere as of late. The Huffington Post is just one remarkable success story. Below, you’ll find some stellar content curation tips that’ll get you on the right track and improve your SEO all around. Narrow Your Focus Obviously, the goal of content curation is to provide a high-quality buffet of the latest and greatest information to a specific subset of readers. Digital communities and online followings tend to be self-selecting, so this shouldn’t be too tough. Just mind your Google Analytics and pay attention to which content offerings score the highest with your audience. Then, tweak your site as needed. Diversify Content Types Mixing videos, image galleries and SlideShare presentations into your typical procession of blog posts and full-length articles helps to flesh out your content profile. Even if certain visitors strictly prefer either video or text, everyone will appreciate a wider array of high-quality content. If you’re going to include infographics, ensure that they’re relevant and valuable. Curate Consistently Now more than ever, maintaining a non-stop flow of fresh content to your blog or your primary portfolio website is absolutely critical. In the wake of the game-changing Penguin update from Google, the words “recent” and “relevant” are practically synonymous. Updating your curated collections on a daily basis is a shrewd SEO move for content curators looking to make a splash. Develop a Sharing Ecosystem Great content that’s curated to appeal to your core demographic can be made even more effective through a concerted social media sharing effort. Passionate users who link back to your website through Twitter, Facebook and Reddit can ultimately explode your traffic if you make sharing simple, intuitive and hassle-free for them. Utilize the Latest Software To find the best content, use sites like Alltop , Zite , Feedly and Flipboard . They’ll give you a heads up on the latest news stories and trends that’ll interest your following. For actual content curation, Scoop.it , Bundlr , Pinterest and Storify are excellent platforms that can be used to pull together an eclectic yet harmonious mix of original and shared content. Rubber, Meet Road The hardest part of content curation is selecting the right tactics for the job. It’ll take a bit of trial and error with various content curation strategies to […]

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Why The Need For Content Curation

Although content curation, where people gather information instead of creating it, benefits marketers it also serves readers as well! Information overload is a major issue for many online due to the relentless contributions of publishers world wide! What people in many cases both need and want is simply a better understanding of the content already available online! It therefore often makes more sense for marketers to simply gather information already published and make use of it for their own purposes! In doing so here are 3 indisputable ways this ‘process’ benefits both publishers and viewers alike! It Aims to Make Better Sense Much news or other material found online has not been properly explained or even sometimes used correctly! This can easily confuse and frustrate viewers trying to make sense of or maybe even put to use any material to which they are exposed! In cases like this the person curating the content typically takes the time and effort to reword or even further explain information to people! In this way curators are able to give readers a better understanding of what may have previously confused them thereby making it more useful to them! It Doesn’t Overwhelm The internet is literally bursting with informative subject matter! In fact so much so that it tends to overwhelm people with information overload! On the other hand ‘reusing’ content, such as what the curation process does, eliminates adding to this ‘clutter’ online but rather strives to make better use of what is already there! Folks as a result tend to be more appreciative of those who choose to gather information to ‘repackage’ and distribute as oppose to creating more of the same! It Builds Authority By locating and ‘translating’ subject matter of relevance for viewers, the curator builds a more authoritative image with their readers! Being the person who can help people gain a better understanding of something that confuses them often attracts much respect, trust and admiration! When working online this type of regard can be the single biggest asset you have! Considering content curation is simply a ‘process’ where people gather information instead of creating something original, how does this benefit readers? Well as our conversation mentioned above due to the relentless publication efforts of people world wide, readers quite often suffer from information overload! In the vast majority of cases people simply want to gain a better understanding of […]

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Content Creation ‘vs’ Content Curation

The internet has become more and more inundated with blogs, videos, tweets, status updates, news, articles, and countless other forms of content available to us, “ the information overload” is something we all seem to be suffering from. It’s becoming so much more difficult to sift through all the “JUNK” out there and pluck out the best, most share-worthy pieces of information, especially if your topic is a niche. Let’s face it, Google definitely has fallen short when it comes to content curation and the more Google tries to cater to all audiences, the less useful it becomes. The extremely high demand for relevant, quality content that’s specific to your unique interests and perspectives has risen to a new generation of tools that’s aiming to help individuals and companies curate content from the web and deliver it in a meaningful way. These great new tools range from simple, applications, specific types such as social media aggregators and discovery engines, to more complex, full-blown publishing solutions for organisations. Why Your Marketing Needs Content Curation At its core, content curation is like being a master editor who brings his unique taste and understanding of his target audience to his own selection of the best content for his readers. He provides context for the content so that it’s more than a collection of information. Content curation defined Content curation chooses the most relevant, highest quality digital information to meet your readers’ needs on a specific subject. In our case, Affiliate marketing. It involves a process of managing, assembling, categorizing, commenting and presenting the most informative content on the planet. This digital content can be in one or more formats such as text, blogs, feeds, images, video and presentations. 3 Reasons your content marketing strategy needs content curation As an integral part of your content marketing strategy, content curation doesn’t push masses of content to your audience. Content curation is a core content marketing element for the following three reasons: 1.  Offering your audience a combination of original and third party (curated) content which provides a branded context for your work. 2.  Curating other people’s content positions you and/or your organisation as a tastemaker in your chosen field. 3.  Creating sufficient, original content is a marketing and business challenge. 12 Attributes of a successful content curation strategy Here are twelve attributes your content curation strategy should have to insure your success. Since content […]

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